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20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 2
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
.5%. some 58 million americans get their social security benefits, most of them seniors. >>> the national security agency is now denying allegations it is accessed the website and servers of yahoo and google. as keith alexander telling politico, tapping those links the agency could collect data from hundreds ever millions of user accounts. >>> u.s.-arab league peace envoy meet with syriamet with syrian r al-assad. trying to persuade the current regime and the increasingly divided opposition to come to the negotiating table. their meeting coming as a damascus suburb currently under siege by government forces. we have more on that evacuation. >> reporter: this is a rare moment of relief and cooperation between regime forces, rebel groups and aid workers. some 1800 syrians have been trapped and were allowed to leave as cease-fire con tyneed to this one area. officials say the civilians were taken to temporary shelters, all the parties cooperated well. >> we have received the call from inside, and from the peop people, that they would prefer to go out because it's not only a matter of eating,
a round of revelations about the national security agency. we have this report. >> these are the slides leaked by whistle blower edward snowden in june revealing u.s. authorities are demanding internet companies hand them user information. as long as the national security agency or the fbi are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are theirs for the searching. carefully worded denils follow from the companies, arguing that they only give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case by case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant sholling the number of sa -- showing the nsa has bypassed this, breaking into googles and yahoo!'s cables. citizens no longer receive protection awes all information is -- as all information is considered foreign. >> the government backs into the cables as a backdoor to get around the complaints. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that do exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are not a citizen, if you are a non-american outside the united states, b
that the national security agency is opening the laws and regulations that we put on them. we probably need to be able to have more transparency about what the foreign surveillance court is up to so that we can lay to rest the accusation that they are just a rubber stamp or that they don't actively double check what the national security agency is up to. so we have a communications challenge that we have got to get out there. that is not to say there is not substance. it is going to be debated. reasonable people can come down on either side of the debate, but that is what is going to be going on in congress this fall is trying to reconcile all of these competing interests. host: michael from las vegas, independent line, hi. caller: as i was telling the person who took my call, i ran who a chap in las vegas gave me suspicion that he might be a terrorist. i tried to call home and security, and it was impossible to get through. nobody answered the phone. i try to get a letter to them, i cannot get any communication. now, what does one do in a case like that? i had a very serious reason why thi
, the problem is we're not getting the full story out of the national security agency. if they had been simply running through spanish calls looking for particular terrorists over the course of a month, 60 million called is no big deal. it's almost acceptable. i think the shock for most people is that the united states allowed this to be leaked out in documented. that's what the french and germans and spanish are reacting to. now as for listening, to heads of state, that's something else. and frankly it would be highly unusual for the national security agency to monitor the chancellor of germany's phone and not tell the president early on. that would be completely opposite standard operating procedure. >> and that's what the "the wall street journal" is saying this morning citing several sources that the president wasn't notified of this. you have called this the worst damage to u.s. intelligence in 30 or 40 years. with a it worth it? >> absolutely not. look, the national security agency, i depended upon it for my entire career. it's got brilliant information when it comes to counterterrorism.
of the national security agency says reports of widespread phone tapping overseas are not true. meanwhile, a proposed bill in congress would sale back some of the n.a.a.'s powers. >> confident and almost defiant, the nation's top spy chiefs made no apologies, vigorously defending the job they do to keep america and its allies safe. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forget this. they continued to try. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. natio
spokesperson, says, general alexander, head of the national security agency did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations chancellor merkel. the president reportedly apologized to merkel who grew up in east germany under the eyes and ears of the sassi. he said he would have stopped the bugging if he had known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble ou
forgive this. they continued to try. >> the work of the national security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the nsa has been collecting phone calls and text mess inls of millions of citizens. congressman james sensesenbrenner, the author of the "the patriot act" is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, stopping dragnet collection of phone calls from citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is tarted and appoint an advocate to the courts protecting rights. the director of national intelligence, james clapper, and national security director keith alexander told the committee the content of phone calls was secret in a lock box, unless there is a link to terrorism. and that, they say, is rare. >> there would only be looked at if we had reasonable and artic u la ble suspicious that we had connection to a foreign, al qaeda-related group, and look into the box. in 2012 we had 2088 such selectors, that we could look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing t
at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a reason why they would tell the white house there's no protocol that insists that they do. and in the case of the monitoring the chancellor merkel and some 35 other leaders, nsa hadn't brought it to the white house's attention. >> the dates are significant because the monitoring dates go back to 2002 on angela merkel, which also would explain from the officials quoted here why the president would not be brought into the loop on this. as bizarre as that sounds to some people. >> at what level it sounds a little odd. you could see a situation where a program starts as far back as 2002 and keeps -- nsa is a very large organization with incredibly monitoring surveillance programs and these things kind of have -- unless someone puts a stop to them. >> many are processing what this means to the world and the u.s. reputation as we know european leaders are quite angry over these revelations. i want to play with european pa
security agency contractor edward snowden released documents that revealed that the u.s. had tapped german canc lor angela merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst, james louis says the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post 9/11 world, the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means more successful attacks. >> reporter: the white house hopes to complete its veview by the end of the year. >> danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> some u.s. lawmakers are defending spying practices. they argue places such as france are safer because of the nsa's surveil
following a bashlash over reports the national security agency has tracked phone calls of dozens of world leaders. >> we recognize there need to be additional constraints how we gather and use intelligence. and it's in the context of this dynamic technology environment that the president has directed us to review our surveillance capabilities. >> one report from a german tabloid indicated that president obama knew that the nsa was tapping the phone of the german chance explore he allowed it to continue, again, german tabloid, a spokeswoman for the agency says that is simply not true. and "the wall street journal" reports the nsa stop monitoring chancellor merkel and other leaders after a white house review uncovered the operations. "the wall street journal" again. meanwhile, a state department spokeswoman says our ambassador to spain met with officials there to discuss reports that the nsa tracked more than 60 million phone calls in that country in one month. dana perino was the press secretary under george w. bush, the 43rd, president bush, 43, and this was happening under bush 43rd. >>
and the national security agency according to a government spokesperson. germany and france are they wanted to go to the u.s. to sign a no spy deal by the end of the year. the leaders have warned a lack of trust could harm the fight against terrorism as well as the merkel's phone was bugged. the nsa claims they have monitored millions of phone calls by both germany and france citizens. this is steve from windham, connecticut on the independent line. caller: i think general alexander should resign. gamedy who follows the spy ought to be able to read "the "the guardian," and new york times." the spying isn't about germany or france. host: what you mean the spying is about ourselves? well, i as an american when i go to europe or to asia, i represent united states in a way, you know? i don't want to be known as the guy who sneaks into his wife's handbag. it is really about ourselves as a people. newspaper and the read what these people are doing? through mrs. to go merkel's handbag? host: that is steve from windham, connecticut, re- freezing our question from this morning. it said should be re-think
spying extends to some of the closest allies abroad. the national security agency end ad program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house order an internal review over the summer. several programs have already been shut down and others are expected to be closed at a later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark, unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. officials say the targets of these programs are not typically decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the nsa's program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the u.p.s. but france and germany and throughout europe. we're trying to gatherable against that helps us and helps the europeans. >> there are reports that the president did know that angela merkel's cell phone was being tapped. >> talk about a confounding story in terms of not understanding the
magazine claims that the national security agency intercepted phone calls as cardinals gathered in march to elect the new pope. church leaders said they are not concerned about the reports. >>> the nsa chief is denying allegations from edward snowden that the agency tapped into google and yahoo! data centers. >>> and breaking news right now, from the middle east, u.n. inspectors have just reported that syria has now destroyed all of its chemical weapon production equipment. that's one day ahead of the deadline. but the country still has roughly 1,000 tons of chemical weapons, including mustard gas and sarin. it has until the middle of next year to destroy those weapons. >>> and troubling statements about the economy. the federal reserve is keeping its economic stimulus program in place for now. that means, printing more money to keep interest rates low. because it says the housing recovery is now starting to slow down, jobs are still not being created quickly enough. however, the fed is not saying just how long the stimulus will last. that uncertainty could hurt stocks on wall street tod
is thecn best-kept secret left in washington d.c. b the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. unanimous consent -- later today -- to approve a six-page require thein administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enactingut obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and ars one-half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and one-half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services toc resign. r i thankes the president, and i yield the floor. be. >> today's white house briefing expected to get under way in just a moment. we will have it live here on c-span2 when it starts. earlier during general speeches in the senate we heard a series of senators talking about the one-year anniversary of hurricane sandy hitting the east coast of the u.s. and recovery efforts. hurr
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
morning, everyone. the head of the national security agency is facing tough questions in the house today about u.s. spying on foreign allies, including presidents and prime ministers. tens of millions of phone calls and e-mails have been intercepted as part of the war on terror. president obama is considering scaling back eavesdropping programs. >>> texas will appeal a federal judge's ruling that blocked a key part of the state's new abortion law. that provision requires any doctor performing the procedure to have privileges at a hospital within 30 miles. democratic state senator wendy davis gained national attention in june when she staged a 13 hour fill libuster to delay pase of the law. >>> two of the inmates who escaped from an oak jail this weekend were recaptured on monday. police say the men were caught 20 miles from the jail after buying snacks at a convenience store. two others are still on the run this morning. the group escaped by crawling through a trap door above a shower in a new $8 million facility. >>> a florida gas station clerk had his life literally saved by his phone.
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)